Class Action FAQs

A Class Action in employment law context is a civil action brought by one or more representative plaintiff on behalf of a larger group of victims (“class members”) for matters involving common defendant(s) involving the same transaction or related transactions. Class Action FAQs:

 

HTW Law Class Action FAQs
Pros and Cons of Class Action Suit
How Does a Class Action Work?
 
 

A Class Action in employment law context is a civil action brought by one or more representative plaintiff on behalf of a larger group of victims (“class members”) for matters involving common defendant(s) involving the same transaction or related transactions. In Ontario, Class Actions are governed by the Class Proceedings Act, 1992. A Class Action allows courts to manage lawsuits that would otherwise be unmanageable if each class member were required to be joined as a named plaintiff.

A Class Action in employment law context is a civil action brought by one or more representative plaintiff on behalf of a larger group of victims (“class members”) for matters involving common defendant(s). Litigation is complex and class actions have advantages as well as disadvantages. In cases where it would not be economical or practical for an individual to bring a claim and multiple claimants are similarly affected, it may be viable to proceed as a class action.

How to Join a Class Action Lawsuit?
 

Before a judge allows your case to move forward as a class action, you will need to prove that:

  • your claim(s) give rise to at least one issue of law or fact;

  • there is an identifiable class of two or more persons that would be represented by the representative plaintiff;

  • their claims arise out of similar circumstances against the same defendant

Ontario is an opt-out jurisdiction. This means that class members are automatically included in the lawsuit unless they choose to opt-out.

When Can I File a Class Action Suit?
 

A statute of limitations is applicable to all lawsuit in Ontario including class action. The most common limitation is on the amount of time a plaintiff has to file his or her claim. You MUST file your suit within the time limit. In Ontario, limitation period is governed by the Limitations Act, 2002. The basic limitation period is 2 years for an employment law class action. But the 2 year limitation period doesn’t apply to sexual harassment cases involving assault or sexual assault.

What are the Steps in Class Action?
 

A Class Action in employment law context is a civil action brought by one or more representative plaintiff on behalf of a larger group of victims (“class members”) for matters involving common defendant(s) involving the same transaction or related transactions. Class Action is a complex process involving many steps, here’s a timeline of events during the lifespan of a typical class action suit.

Consequence of Losing Class Action?
 

In Ontario, losing a class action as a representative plaintiff means that you could personally be responsible for paying your own legal fee as well as the defendant(s)’s legal costs, unless a contingency fee (no-win-no-fee) agreement exists between you and your class action lawyer. If you are a class member, you do not take on the responsibility of paying legal costs, unless there’s an existing agreement between class members that said otherwise.