Defamation FAQs

Defamation refers to harming reputation of another by making a false written or oral statement about that person to a third party in public. Defamation focus on repaying those harmed by false statement. Defamation FAQs:

 

HTW Law Defamation FAQs
Do I Get Severance If I Get Fired?
 

Defamation is defined as harming another person’s reputation by making a false written or oral statement about that person to a third party in public. Defamation law is a balancing act between freedom of expression and restitution for individuals harmed thereby. Almost all employment law defamation cases involve one person suing another for damages from defamatory statements, made intentionally in public, or there won't be a defamation case in employment law context..

Do I Get Severance If I Get Fired?
 

There are two main forms of defamation, namely Slander and Libel. Slander: defamation with no permanent record, like a spoken statement. Libel: defamation with a permanent record, such as an email, a newspaper. In Ontario, Libel and Slander Act governs defamation.

Sue Someone Telling Lies About Me

You can file suit against someone spreading lies about you. Often times, it's easy for a defamation lawyer to send a letter to the individual, demanding that they stop spreading the rumors. However, before you spend the money to file a lawsuit I would consider the high cost of commencing a lawsuit of this kind with the outcome you're seeking.

 
Legal Defence in Defamation Cases

The Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms guarantees the right to “freedom of thought, belief, opinion and expression, but this right is not absolute. Defamation law is a balancing act between freedom of expression and restitution for individuals harmed thereby. There are a number of legal defenses against defamation:

  • True Statement

  • Absolute Privilege

  • Qualified Privilege

  • Fair Comment

  • Responsible Communication